Veterinarian training courses library : Dog / Dermatology

  • DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 26 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • Otitis externa (OE) is defined as an acute or chronic inflammation of the external ear canal. In dogs, it is a very common alteration, being reported to represent up to 20% of all visits seen in the daily small animal clinic. In cats, otitis externa is less common, accounting for about 4% of all medical cases. Although it is often considered a diagnosis, otitis externa is just a clinical sign, almost always resulting from an underlying primary cause, almost always involving a secondary infection, and in which other predisposing and perpetuating factors also contribute to the disease. For the effective management of all cases of otitis, these factors must be identified and controlled.
    • Otitis media (OM) usually occurs as an extension of otitis externa and can occur in up to 80% of cases of chronic otitis, being a frequent cause of therapeutic failure in the management of OE.
    • With this class we intend to define the most appropriate therapeutic approaches taking into account the different clinical scenarios.
    DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 29 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • Otitis externa (OE) is defined as an acute or chronic inflammation of the external ear canal. In dogs, it is a very common alteration, being reported to represent up to 20% of all visits seen in the daily small animal clinic. In cats, otitis externa is less common, accounting for about 4% of all medical cases. Although it is often considered a diagnosis, otitis externa is just a clinical sign, almost always resulting from an underlying primary cause, almost always involving a secondary infection, and in which other predisposing and perpetuating factors also contribute to the disease. For the effective management of all cases of otitis, these factors must be identified and controlled.
    • Otitis media (OM) usually occurs as an extension of otitis externa and can occur in up to 80% of cases of chronic otitis, being a frequent cause of therapeutic failure in the management of OE.
    • With this class we intend to define the best diagnostic approach in cases of acute and chronic external otitis.
    DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 20 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • One of the most frequent veterinary consult complaints is otitis externa (OE). Approximately 20% of all canine patients have some type of ear disease.
    • Otitis externa occurs as a consequence of a multitude of causes and factors. Primary causes result in ear canal inflammation, predisposing factors increase the risk for the development of otitis, and perpetuating factors delay a clinical cure. The control of these factors is the key to avoid chronicity and recurrence of otitis externa.
    • The purpose of this lecture is, therefore, to summarize the various factors and causes associated with canine otitis externa development.
    DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 29 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • Historically, in the treatment of pyoderma, empirical systemic antibiotic therapy based on the clinical presentation was considered adequate, with an emphasis on the selection of an adequate antibiotic dose and duration of treatment.
    • With the recent emergence of multi-resistant bacteria, the approach to pyoderma has changed, and the correct diagnosis through cytological analysis and bacterial culture is now of great importance as it allows us to ensure the responsible use of systemic antibiotic therapy.
    • The objectives of this class are to provide keys for a correct choice of the most appropriate treatment for different types of pyoderma.
    DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 32 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • Scaling is an accumulation of loose debris from the stratum corneum (corneocytes). Scaling can have various appearances and be dry, thin, slab or greasy and vary in color from white, silver, yellow, brown or grey.
    • Corneocytes are the end product of epidermal keratinization and the normal loss of these cells is not visible to the naked eye as corneocytes are released individually or in small groups. In abnormal scaling, there is a loss of large scales. Scaling may be primary in primary idiopathic seborrhea and ichthyosis. However, scaling is more often secondary to a chronic inflammatory process. In the presence of pruritus, the differential diagnosis should include parasitic infections, allergies, infectious diseases such as pyoderma or Malassezia dermatitis.
    • If pruritus is not present, differential diagnoses should include primary endocrinopathies, demodicosis, dermatophytosis, leishmaniasis, nutritional imbalances, metabolic diseases, and cutaneous neoplasia such as cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma. In cats, exfoliative dermatitis associated or not with thymoma should also be considered.
    DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 28 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • LED is a relatively benign, autoimmune condition that affects the dog's nasal planum and in which systemic manifestations are absent.
    • It is the second most common immune-mediated skin pathology in dogs.
    • Exposure to ultraviolet light aggravates and exacerbates LED and there are breeds that may be predisposed since they are reported more frequently, as the Collie, Shetland Sheep Dog, Australian Shepherd, German Shepherd and Siberian Husky.
    • Therapeutic approaches are multiple and different effectiveness has been reported.
    DV Diana FERREIRA
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 34 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • In recent years, new therapeutic options have been developed for the management of CAD, and, in parallel with the evolution in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of this condition, a new way of looking at the manner we use these new therapies has also emerged.
    • Currently, a proactive therapeutic approach is emphasized in which, while correcting the underlying pathogenesis whenever possible, active relapses are actively prevented, through a constant control of the inflammation associated with the allergic condition.
    • In this new therapeutic approach, the management of CAD is done in two phases:
    • A first phase of REACTIVE therapy, in which the active clinical signs (pruritic and lesional being acute or chronic) is rapidly controlled in order to induce clinical remission;
    • A second phase of PROACTIVE therapy with the goal of preventing relapses, through the regular control of subclinical inflammation.
    DV Pascal PRÉLAUD
    Dipl. ECVD
    Video time : 16 min + MCQ
    Dermatology
    Teaching goals
    • Knowing how to recognize the clinical signs of the most common dermatoses of the breed.
    • Knowing the phenotypic particularities of dermatoses according to the breed of dog (or cat).